Aging Ice Cider

A few weekends ago, my friend (not a beer geek) shared an ice cider that was about a decade old. He bought it while we were in Montreal and just hasn’t gotten to it till now. His goal was not to purposefully age it. However, it was very interesting. Have some of the aged character with such a sweet beverage have it more nuance.

Anyone have experience doing this? Any thoughts on it?

one of my favourite drinks ever was an Ice Cider that leaked and started to oxidize a little bit.

Generally speaking though it shouldn’t change much at all over a few years, it’s too sweet for that. I believe one of the Canadian Ice Cider raters also mentioned on here once that he had an open bottle of Neige in his fridge for 10 years and then tasted it next to a fresh one and barely found any difference.

Everything eventually turns to vinegar. Just might take a while. Everything I’ve tasted that was old generally was mellower, a little oxidized & a little flatter in flavor.

This one definitely had signs of age. It was not kept in ideal storage conditions.

Ice Cider is rather expensive and I have never stored any more than a year or two.

I have had several that were a year or three old, sometimes bought that old sometimes I have unintentionally cellared them waiting a for a good time to share them. I find sometimes they start to take on a bit of oxidation / caramelization compared to fresh ones but I have never done a side by side tasting with a fresh version of the same cider to compare so it’s possible flavours I am attributing to age were always there.

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Eden Puck was aged for eight years in a French oak barrel and was very good indeed:
https://www.ratebeer.com/beer/eden-puck/896616/

With the high sweetness would have thought that Ice Ciders would age well, but I’ve always drunk mine too quickly to test that theory!

Come up to Jersey City, I’ve got a bunch of 10-20 year old bottles to share.

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