RateBeer Forums

Drinking straight of the can/bottle

OK i know it goes against everything we hold dear as beer nerds…but sometimes the beer just tastes better straight from its storage receptacle.
I have had many…but one tonight just reminded me…it was Von Eberts Volatile Substance IPA ( Portland) in a can…in the glass it was OK…but i tried it straight from the can and it was way better…as far as flavour and especially how it felt .
Any one else had beer from the can/bottle superior to pourin into a glass…and yes i had the correct glassware.

1 Like

Can’t say I’ve noticed a major taste difference, but sometimes it’s just too much trouble to pour and drink, you just want to knock it back (hot day, mowing the lawn, just want a cold beer to ease the suffering!)

1 Like

Tain’t nothing wrong with drinking from the vessel rather than from a glass. And yeah, sometimes it even tastes better that way but I would need to be in the mood…

2 Likes

Actually I like it better for carbonation reasons sometimes. It seems like some beer are pretty flat if poured into a glass.

1 Like

I’m an odd duck. I obviously always prefer a glass, but I do enjoy lagers from bottles, especially if at a social event. Not so much ales, just lagers. And never from a can. I hate drinking from cans. It has to be a lager and a glass bottle, otherwise, if I can’t have a glass, I’d just as well go without having the beer all together. No idea or reason behind this other than perhaps I have neurotic.

I had an Alchemist can recently that said all over the can that it should not be poured into the glass for reasons of losing carbonation / aroma, so I drank that from the can.

If I have had a beer before, I will often drink straight from the can, but that is more laziness than anything else.

I’ll always prefer to drink from a glass…

We can get a better appreciation for Appearance and Nose that way.

However, some beers have a better mouthfeel straight from the can or bottle (mostly from the can for me for whatever reason).

In the end, it’s not a crime.

2 Likes

If I’m grilling, fishing I’ll drink from can (or bottle in my backyard). At the beach I’ll keep a metal bottle at hand along with a small cooler.
I agree with @HuskerTan though that lagers seem to go down better from the bottle or can; the drier the better.
If I see a beer that says drink from can OF COURSE I’m pouring it because dafork are you hiding, Alchemist?? :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

Hard to rate a beer without a glass!

3 Likes

Alchemist was hiding the haze back from when haze was uncool… now the disclaimer on the can is a relic.

2 Likes

Well yeah. Rate it in a glass first.

We need Scotty’s transparent aluminum.

1 Like

Aluminium?

1 Like

Scotty was revealing it in San Francisco, so not the Non-North American spelling.

“” Both aluminum and aluminium have a long history of use referring to the metallic element (commonly used as foil to cover food). … Aluminum became preferred in the United States and Canada, while aluminium became favored throughout the rest of the English-speaking world.

1 Like

I lived in Australia for a while so aluminium stuck with me. I always reckoned that it had a grammatically smoother sound.

Like Strine?

I do it when it’s necessary. If we’re in the veld (I don’t do that much anymore) or at a braai and there are no glasses, I drink from the bottle or the can.

1 Like

A lot of the American adjunct lagers are best had straight from the bottle. I assume it’s because the „off“ odors are less pronounced. The biggest example here for me would be Rolling Rock, which I rated a decent 2.8 if sipped straight from the bottle, but would probably struggle to get much over 2.0 from me in a glass.

No way

1 Like

Yes I agree with this, some lagers especially although I have just discovered this to be true with Newcastle Brown Ale (UK) as well.

I will always rate beer from the glass though to be consistent.

1 Like




Add To RateBeer

Add A Beer
Add A Brewer
Add A Place
Add An Event


Manage Your Account

Add Premium
Edit Profile
Messages
Sign out

RateBeer Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter, RateBeer Weekly, a must for understanding new people, places and beers in worldwide craft culture.


Stay Connected


2000- 2017 © RateBeer, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service