Is glassware important to you?

I was just wondering if you find glassware important when it comes to drinking/tasting beer. I usually try to drink beer from the right glassware at the right temperature, but I don’t have many beer glasses as I am new to beer drinking(I only started 1 year and a few weeks ago). I do have a glass for wheat beer , a cilindrical glass for most belgian ales etc. but there is big room for improvement in my collection. For me glassware is important but not crucial as it seems to help in keeping the foam alive. So does it matter to you if you use the corect glassware? Do you think that it is important to have a large glassware selection when it comes to serving beer? Also excuse my bad english , it is a secondary language to me :relaxed: .

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In the US, craft beer people used to take this very seriously, but lately have stopped caring as much I feel. Bars these days seem to just use the same glass (teku, tulip or wine glass) for all styles (or giving all beers in small flight glasses). Also at a beer festival, you use what you use. Generally, I do not think the style of glass matters so much as having a glass that is the right size for a pour.

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I do use glassware but don’t obsess over the “correct” glass for a certain style. Most of the styles I normally drink flow very nicely from a relatively tall, slim glass anyway and I like that elegant look though I don’t want easily knocked over glasses.
Glassware IS important when I travel though, because I hate to find myself at a hotel room with NO glass. Of course any glass will do in that situation so I will just go to the lobby or bar and get a pint or tumbler…

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I have a good hundred glasses, but tend to use the same five or six. I definitely enjoy drinking out of the correct glassware, especially with a Belgian beer. I think the unique glassware of Belgian beers is awesome. I don’t really drink out of pint glasses other than at the bar. I don’t enjoy drinking out of a plastic cup at festivals. A small snifter is ideal for me in that scenario. I wish glassware had more fill lines, as I feel most breweries tend to short-pour.

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I TRY to. I don’t drink out of any plastic cups or anything like that. Also try to avoid pint glasses if I can. I have a tulip glass and another tulip-esque glass that I use 90% of the time. I have probably a dozen glasses but stick to my two favorites. Making sure the glass is CLEAN is in my opinion more important than the shape. As for temperature, I keep everything that can age in my basement in a cabinet that stays around 60 degrees. Everything else is in a designated fridge that is kept at 45 degrees.

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I was stuck using a warped plastic cup at my hotel in Nuremburg recently until I “upgraded” to a styrofoam cup I realized I had in my bag that I used as padding for a bottle I had brought over. Tempted to start packing a snifter when I travel.

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My glass collection is over 60 and I do think it makes a difference and enhances my enjoyment of the beer if the best glass for the size of bottle/can and style is used.

Hate plastic or paper cups and always take my own glass to a festival if I know they are using non-glassware.

<*))))))><

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There are bars serving beers in marmalade jars, I would not care too much if I were you.

Anyway, I think a couple of glasses can be sufficient.

I use a couple of glasses for myself:

  • Glass Stein or Dimpled mug for lagers (pils/helles/schwarz/bock)
  • Shaker for IPA/APA/Stout/Porter
  • Flute for Pils/Hefeweizen
  • Craft Master One for everything
  • Altbier glass for alt/kölsch
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I have two set of fancyish (antique) general purpose (an almost stemless snifter) glasses for sit-down tastings (two different sizes, depending on the number of people and bottle sizes), but if I’m just cracking a few lager/APA ticks open on sauna night I just use a jar/mug with a handle, as I’ll have wet hands.

I do have about 150 other glasses that I don’t use, because they don’t give me anything special from the experience apart from having to be more careful when washing up.

Any beer that’s harmed by being in a non-fancy glass is a beer that’s got its head too far up its own arse. All I ask for is a bit of head room.

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I think that the worst part at a festival is to be able to find the right name for the beer when it is served from a tap. The last time I went to a beer festival I had to search a few minutes for the beer on ratebeer because some brewers just wrote IPA and PILS in front of using the full name. I found it very annoying.

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I do agree that the glass must be clean for obvious reasons, and a glass that’s way too big or small for the serving can be awkward to uncomfortable.
I don’t want a beer from a mason jar but I admit I have a couple clear hard plastic pilsners that I keep just for grilling etc. outdoors.

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Too right. Apart from Pauwel Kwak, where let’s face it the glass is what makes it memorable, especially when out with friends who’ve not seen it before!

I’ve got several glasses people have given me but generally just stick with a particularly comfortable engraved pint glass my wife gave if I’m on my own, or old festival half-pinters when sharing with friends.

Agree that glass is by far the best material.

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I find there are some styles (e.g., Belgians, Stouts/Porters, Double IPA’s, etc.) where concentrating the aroma/head (e.g., snifter, tulip, goblet) can enhance the drinking experience but for other styles (e.g., Helles, Pale Lagers, Blond Ales) it isn’t going to make much difference as the aromatics and heads aren’t quite as important. That being said, if you’re going to have one type of glass that you typically drink out of, why not make it a snifter, tulip or goblet? Better to “waste” a good glass on a beer that won’t benefit much from it that “waste” a good beer on a glass that doesn’t help it. This is probably more advice for your drinking at home. If you insist that your pale lager be served in a tulip glass or snifter when out in public you will be the height of pretentiousness and probably find something in your glass other than just beer…

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I always use glassware and try to taste beer with the appropriate “right” glass for a certain style. In any case, most of the styles that I usually drink are very well combined with my main types of glass. But, I won’t buy some glasses for non-basic styles of beer

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As long as it’s clean

I used to care about this, but nowadays pilsner urquell mug is basically all i need… once in a blue moon I use teku or one of the “fancy” glasses…

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That being said I like when bar serves from the proper glassware…

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From my point of view, realistically, all boils down to the following:

  1. NEVER PLASTIC CUPS

  2. Having said that… three (or four) things:

Anything vaguely similar to a bulb-shaped glass. A tulip would do the job great. It will double as a snifter, tulip, etc. for all beers that are Belgian ales, or behave like them (big carbonation, big aroma…), imperial stouts and their extended family and so on. I think it’s fair to say one knows when a beer deserves this.

A glass slimmer than a tumbler but not stiletto-thin (more versatile). Lagers of pretty much any kind, can potentially do the trick for many ales. Good view for colour and retains head better.

Then there is a good number of bitters, Anglo-ales, milder porters, and so on that will literally be fine in a normal cylindrical or truncated cone glass of any kind. There is no harm in having a spare tumbler (not patterned glass if possible), but otherwise the beer couldn’t care less about its container.

Oh and of course, the Orval glass. Just for beer-chauvinism. And for the odd Orval.

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Many years ago I was photographed while in an Alaskan bar drinking a shitty Bud or something out of a ‘Jam Jar’, my mates claiming to post a copy to my local CAMRA Branch; luckily it was before the internet and stuff!

<*))))))><

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